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home | Locations | New Brunswick is 1 of 6 cities in th . . .
 

New Brunswick is 1 of 6 cities in the Central New Jersey area with Active Retirement Communities.
Ivan Gillis
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Active Retirement Communities

 State:   New Jersey—Central

 City:     New Brunswick

New Brunswick is a city in Middlesex County, New Jersey, United States. It is the county seat of Middlesex, and the home of Rutgers University. The city is located on the Northeast Corridor rail line, 27 miles (43 km) southwest of Manhattan, on the southern bank of the Raritan River.

At the 2010 United States Census, the population of New Brunswick was 55,181, reflecting an increase of 6,608 (+13.6%) from the 48,573 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 6,862 (+16.5%) from the 41,711 counted in the 1990 Census.

Due to the concentration of medical facilities in the area, including Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and Saint Peter's University Hospital, as well as Rutgers University's Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick is known as "the Healthcare City", The corporate headquarters and production facilities of several global pharmaceutical companies are situated in the city, including Johnson & Johnson and Bristol-Myers Squibb.

New Brunswick was formed by Royal charter on December 30, 1730, within other townships in Middlesex County and Somerset County and was reformed by Royal charter with the same boundaries on February 12, 1763, at which time it was divided into north and south wards. New Brunswick was incorporated as a city by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on September 1, 1784.

New Brunswick is noted for its ethnic diversity. At one time, one quarter of the Hungarian population of New Jersey resided in the city and in the 1930s one out of three city residents were Hungarian. Today, much of that Hungarian community continues to thrive as well as a growing Hispanic community that has developed around French Street near Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital.

New Brunswick was incorporated as a town in 1736 and chartered as a city in 1784. It was occupied by the British in the winter of 1776-1777 during the Revolutionary War.

The Declaration of Independence received one of its first public readings in New Brunswick in the days following its promulgation by the Continental Congress.

The Trustees of Queen's College (now Rutgers University), founded in 1766, voted to locate the young college in New Brunswick, selecting this city over Hackensack, in Bergen County, New Jersey.

People

The racial makeup of the city was 45.43% (25,071) White, 16.04% (8,852) Black or African American, 0.90% (498) Native American, 7.60% (4,195) Asian, 0.03% (19) Pacific Islander, 25.59% (14,122) from other races, and 4.39% (2,424) from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 49.93% (27,553) of the population.

Out of the total people living in poverty, 25.9% were under the age of 18 and 13.8% were 65 or older.

Hungarian Community

New Brunswick began attracting a Hungarian immigrant population around the turn of the 20th century. Hungarians were primarily attracted to the city by employment at Johnson & Johnson factories located in the city. Hungarians settled mainly in what today is the fifth ward.

The immigrant population grew until the end of the early century immigration boom. During the Cold War, the community was revitalized by the decision to house refugees from the failed 1956 Hungarian Revolution at Camp Kilmer, in nearby Edison. Even though the Hungarian population has been largely supplanted by newer immigrants, there continues to be a Hungarian Festival in the city held on Somerset Street on the first Saturday of June each year.

Many Hungarian institutions set up by the community remain and active in the neighborhood, including: Magyar Reformed Church, Ascension Lutheran Church (Elso Magyar Evangélikus Egyhaz) St. Ladislaus Roman Catholic Church, St. Joseph Byzantine Catholic Church, Hungarian American Athletic Club, Aprokfalva Montessori Preschool (Aprokfalva Mindennapos Magyar Óvoda),Széchenyi Hungarian Community School & Kindergarten (Széchenyi Magyar Iskola és Óvoda), Teleki Pál Scout Home, Hungarian American Foundation, Vers Hangja, Hungarian Poetry Group, Bolyai Lecture Series on Arts and Sciences (Bolyai Kör),Hungarian Alumni Association (Magyar Öregdiák Szövetség - Bessenyei György Kör), Hungarian Radio Program, Hungarian Civic Association, Committee of Hungarian Churches and Organizations of New Brunswick, Csurdöngölo Folk Dance Ensemble.

Several landmarks in the city also testify to its Hungarian heritage. There is a street and a recreation park named after Lajos Kossuth, the famous leader of the Hungarian Revolution of 1848. The corner of Somerset Street and Plum Street is named Mindszenty Square where the first ever statue of Cardinal Joseph Mindszenty was erected. A stone memorial to the victims of the 1956 Hungarian Revolution also stands nearby.

Latino Community

About 50% of New Brunswick's population is self-identified as Hispanic, the 14th highest percentage among municipalities in New Jersey. Since the 1960s, many of the new residents of New Brunswick have come from Latin America. Many citizens moved from Puerto Rico in the 1970s. In the 1980s, many immigrated from the Dominican Republic, and still later from Guatemala, Honduras, Ecuador and Mexico.

New Brunswick contains a number of examples of urban renewal in the United States. In the 1960s-1970s, the downtown area became blighted as middle class residents moved to newer suburbs surrounding the city, an example of the phenomenon known as "white flight". Beginning in 1975, Rutgers University, Johnson & Johnson, and the local government collaborated through the New Jersey Economic Development Authority to form the New Brunswick Development Company (DevCo), with the goal of revitalizing the city center and redeveloping neighborhoods considered to be blighted and dangerous (via demolition of existing buildings and construction of new ones).

Johnson & Johnson decided to remain in New Brunswick and built a new World Headquarters building in the area between Albany Street, Amtrak's Northeast Corridor, Route 18, and George Street, requiring many old buildings and historic roads to be removed. The Hiram Market area, a historic district which by the 1970s had become a mostly Puerto Rican and Dominican-American neighborhood, was demolished to build a Hyatt hotel and conference center, and upscale housing. Johnson & Johnson guaranteed Hyatt Hotels' investment as they were wary of building an upscale hotel in a run-down area.

The redevelopment process has been controversial. Devco, the hospitals, and the city government continue to draw ire from both historic preservationists, those opposing gentrification, and those concerned with eminent domain abuses, and tax abatements for developers.

Higher Education

Rutgers University has three campuses in the city: College Avenue Campus (seat of the University), Douglass Campus, and Cook Campus, which limits extend into outer townships. Rutgers has also added several buildings downtown in the last two decades, both academic and residential.

New Brunswick is the site to the New Brunswick Theological Seminary, a seminary of the Reformed Church in America, founded in 1784.

Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, part of Rutgers University, is located in New Brunswick and Piscataway.

Middlesex County College has some facilities downtown, though its main campus is in Edison.

Health Care

City Hall has promoted the nickname "The Health Care City" to reflect the importance of the healthcare industry to its economy. The city is home to the world headquarters of Johnson & Johnson, along with several medical teaching and research institutions including Saint Peter's University Hospital, Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and the Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, the Cancer Institute of New Jersey, and The Bristol-Myers Squibb Children's Hospital.

Culture

Theatre

Three neighboring professional venues, Crossroads Theatre designed by Parsons+Fernandez-Casteleiro Architects from New York. In 1999, the Crossroads Theatre won the prestigious Tony Award for Outstanding Regional Theatre. Crossroads is the first African American theater to receive this honor in the 33-year history of this special award category.

There is also George Street Playhouse, and the State Theatre, comprise the heart of the local theatre scene. The State Theatre is also home to the American Repertory Ballet and the Princeton Ballet School.. Rutgers University has a number of student companies that perform everything from cabaret acts to Shakespeare and musical productions.

Museums

New Brunswick is the site of the Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum at Rutgers University, Albus Cavus, and the Rutgers University Geology Museum.

Art

New Brunswick was an important centre for avant-garde art in the 1950s-70s with several artists such as Allan Kaprow, George Segal, George Brecht, Robert Whitman, Robert Watts, Lucas Samaras, Geoffrey Hendricks and Roy Lichtenstein; some of whom had taught at Rutgers University. This group of artists was sometimes referred to as the 'New Jersey School' or the 'New Brunswick School of Painting'. For more information, see Fluxus at Rutgers University.

Grease Trucks

The "Grease Trucks" are a group of truck-based food vendors located on the College Avenue campus of Rutgers University. They are known for serving "Fat Sandwiches", a sub roll containing several ingredients such as steak, chicken fingers, French fries, falafel, cheeseburgers, mozzarella sticks, gyro meat, bacon, eggs and / or marinara sauce.

Music

New Brunswick's bar scene has been the home to many original rock bands, including some which went on to national prominence such as The Smithereens and Bon Jovi, as well as a center for local punk rock and underground music. Many alternative rock bands got radio airplay thanks to Matt Pinfield who was part of the New Brunswick music scene for over 20 years at Rutgers University radio station WRSU. Local pubs and clubs hosted many local bands, including the Court Tavern until 2012 (scheduled to reopen), and the Melody Bar during the 1980s and 1990s.

Popular Culture

On April 18, 1872, at New Brunswick, William Cameron Coup developed the system of loading circus equipment and animals on railroad cars from one end and through the train, rather than from the sides. This system would be adopted by other railroad circuses and used through the golden age of railroad circuses and even by the Ringling shows today.

The 1980s sitcom, Charles in Charge, was set in New Brunswick.

The 2004 movie Harold and Kumar Go To White Castle revolves around Harold and Kumar's attempt to get to a White Castle restaurant that ultimately winds up being in New Brunswick.

Points of Interest

Albany Street Bridge across the Raritan River to Highland Park

Bishop House, 115 College Avenue, a mansion of the Italianate style of architecture, was built for James Bishop. Placed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1976.

Old Queens, built in 1809, is the oldest building at Rutgers University.

Buccleuch Mansion in Buccleuch Park

Historic Christ Church Episcopal Churchyard, New Brunswick

The Henry Guest House

William H. Johnson House c. 1870

St. Peter The Apostle Church, built in 1856 and located at 94 Somerset Street.

Delaware and Raritan Canal

The historic Old Queens Campus and Voorhees Mall at Rutgers University

Birthplace of poet Joyce Kilmer

Kilmer Square, a retail/commercial complex on Albany Street

Site of Johnson & Johnson world headquarters

Rutgers Gardens (in nearby North Brunswick)

The Willow Grove Cemetery near downtown

Grave of Mary Ellis (1750–1828). This grave stands out due to its location in the AMC Theatres parking lot on U.S. Route 1 downriver from downtown New Brunswick.

Lawrence Brook, a tributary of the Raritan River.

Elmer B. Boyd Park, a park running along the Raritan River, adjacent to Route 18.

Income & Housing Costs Numbers:

Estimated median household income in 2009: $45,173 (it was $36,080 in 2000)

New Brunswick:

$45,173

New Jersey:

$68,342

Estimated per capita income in 2009: $17,469

New Brunswick city income, earnings, and wages data

Estimated median house or condo value in 2009: $280,365 (it was $125,700 in 2000)

New Brunswick:

$280,365

New Jersey:

$348,300

Mean prices in 2009: All housing units: $308,527; Detached houses: $325,937; Townhouses or other attached units: $217,802; In 2-unit structures: $324,743; In 3-to-4-unit structures: $343,684; In 5-or-more-unit structures: $162,292

Median gross rent in 2009: $1,215.

March 2012 cost of living index in New Brunswick: 125.5 (high, U.S. average is 100)

In-Depth Facts and Figures as listed below, plus other information:

  • Climate Charts

1.      Average Temperature

2.      Precipitation (Rain)

3.      Humidity

4.      Wind Speed (MPH)

5.      Snowfall

6.      Sunshine

7.      Cloudy Days

  • Tornado Activity History
  • Hospitals & Medical
  • Airports
  • Colleges/Universities
  • High Schools
  • Locations of Interest
  • Shopping Centers
  • Churches
  • Lakes/Streams/Rivers/Creeks/Parks
  • Tourist Attractions
  • Banks
  • Housing Costs Information
  • Crime Statistics
  • Radio Stations AM/FM
  • TV Broadcast Stations
  • Discussion Forums

 

For the above information and photos, use this link:

 

http://www.city-data.com/city/New-Brunswick-New-Jersey.html

 

Total Tax Burden--Data for Calculation

 

http://www.retirementliving.com/RLstate2.html#NEW%20JERSEY

 

Listing of Active Retirement Communities:

 

http://www.retirenet.com/location/communities/152-central-jersey/53-all-active-retirement-communities-and-retirement-homes/

 

OTHER SITES OF INTEREST:

Silly Service—38 Years of Federal Civil Service (A book in progress, with weekly additions)

www.ivanegillis.com        

Gillis Motor News (Monthly Listing of Car Events Nationwide)

www.Gillismotornews.com

World of Collectibles

http://www.collectibleshg.info

Dogs

http://www.zcanines.com

Cats

http://www.zcats.com

Bird Watching

http://www.zavians.com

Dance Sites

http://www.ezdancers.com

World of Antiques

http://www.eantiques.info

MODEL TRAINS & RAILROADING

http://www.modeltrainsetc.com

Quilts, Quilters, & Quilting

http://www.quiltscentral.com

EZ Rides

http://www.ez-ride.com

OLD TRUCKS

http://www.zoldtrucks.com

EVERTHING MUSIC

http://www.ezmusica.com

FARM TRACTOR COLLECTORS

http://www.tractorscollectors.com

DESSERT FIRST

http://www.ezdessert.com

SPORT & EXOTIC CARS

http://www.sports-exoticcars.com

HOME WINE MAKING

http://www.winemakingetal.com

OFF-ROADING

http://offroadingetc.com

 

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